Goats, sheep, deer, wild turkeys, and other animals have been spotted strolling through streets and plazas in cities around the world lately—content, it seems, to be free of human interference. On certain days, it can appear that many places are being reclaimed, at least in part, by nature. This week, we’re bringing you a selection of pieces about the animal world. In “Little Wing,” Susan Orlean recounts the unique characteristics of homing pigeons and traces the history of pigeon racing. Patricia Marx explores the sometimes humorous world of emotional-support animals, and David Sedaris encounters several mischievous—and persistent—birds around his house in Normandy. In “Dog Story,” Adam Gopnik writes about his daughter’s first dog and considers the canine’s reputation as man’s best friend. Finally, in “Cairo: A Type of Love Story,” Peter Hessler reflects on the cat that became a member of his family while he was living in Egypt during the country’s Arab Spring revolution. We hope that these stories add a bit of liveliness to your weekend.

David Remnick


The Birds

Why did they want to come in?


Dog Story
Illustrations by Jules Feiffer

cijilu123永不失效地址How did the dog become our master?


Photograph by Mary Ellen Mark

cijilu123永不失效地址When homing pigeons leave home.


Photograph by Patricia Marx

Why are so many animals now in places where they shouldn’t be?


Raising a family during a revolution.